Levels of organisational development – Level 5

coordination
Levels of organisational development – Level 5
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Following on from the previous posts about this new research, today I look at level 5 of the six levels of organisational development. Level five is the coordination level.

Level 1 – Formation

Level 2 – Formalisation

Level 3 – Integration

Level 4 – Expansion

 

Level 5: Coordination

 

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The 6 Levels of Organisational Development

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As the organisation or company needs to becomes more connected and coordinated as a result of the expansion phase, it also become increasingly bureaucratic as the management and leadership try to pull the operations together and get them coordinated.

The intention in this stage is to get everything working together and to create flow. However in doing so things become more systems and administratively driven.

 

coordination level of development

 

The distinctive features of the coordination level of organisational development is characterised by: –

a)    Bureaucratic management and inadequate motivation systems do not allow people to work in ways which increase emotional and intellectual engagement. People start to feel like ‘a number’.

b)    Organisational structure of management with a particular functional responsibility prevents the organisation from further development because of the slow and overly bureaucratic decision-making

The coordination level of organisational development needs to result in the formulation of a ‘unifying’ development strategy for the organisation which includes the articulation and formalisation and implementation of corporate cultural norms within the organisation. This results in increasing the degree of involvement of the entire organisation’s personnel in defining and developing the culture and working practices within the company and an increasing interest in the development of the staff particularly in terms of values development.

 

Next: Level 6 – Self-organisation and self-development

 

You can get a complete explanatory infographic of the 6 levels of organisational development including the full reference to this study…

What you should to know about the organizational levels of development

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David Wilkinson

David Wilkinson is the Editor-in-Chief of the Oxford Review. He is also acknowledged to be one of the world's leading experts in dealing with ambiguity and uncertainty and developing emotional resilience. David teaches and conducts research at a number of universities including the University of Oxford, Medical Sciences Division, Cardiff University, Oxford Brookes University School of Business and many more. He has worked with many organisations as a consultant and executive coach including Schroders, where he coaches and runs their leadership and management programmes, Royal Mail, Aimia, Hyundai, The RAF, The Pentagon, the governments of the UK, US, Saudi, Oman and the Yemen for example. In 2010 he developed the world's first and only model and programme for developing emotional resilience across entire populations and organisations which has since become known as the Fear to Flow model which is the subject of his next book. In 2012 he drove a 1973 VW across six countries in Southern Africa whilst collecting money for charity and conducting on the ground charity work including developing emotional literature in children and orphans in Africa and a number of other activities. He is the author of The Ambiguity Advanatage: What great leaders are great at, published by Palgrave Macmillian. See more: About: About David Wikipedia: David's Wikipedia Page

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