Organisational culture and history – a method of understanding mergers and acquisitions | The Oxford Review

Organisational culture and history – a method of understanding mergers and acquisitions

Research Briefing

Organisational culture and history – a method of understanding mergers and acquisitions

Keywords: organisational culture, research methods, history, oral histories, uncertainty, mergers and acquisitions

Over the last 10-15 years the importance of understanding the organisational culture of merging organisations has come to the fore. Many failed mergers and acquisitions have been put down to cultural clashes and misunderstandings. Organisational culture is now a major component in the decision-making process of which organisations to merge with.

Whilst culture has become a standard part of the ‘fit’ matrix between organisations, the methods for distilling and understanding those cultures are far from standardised and agreed.

A really interesting study has been looking at the use of what is known as the ‘historical perspective’ to analyse organisational cultures. In essence, this means understanding and analysis of the histories and founding stories of the organisations involved, through oral histories and mapping uncertainty.

This briefing will be of extreme interest to anyone involved or interested in organisational culture, mergers and acquisitions, uncertainty and organisational development. This is a somewhat unique and fascinating study.

 

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